Super Bowl: 5 commercials that go beyond TV

Once again we were hypnotized by this year’s Super Bowl ads. Some of them found a way to make TV and Web work together. Closing the ad with a hashtag is something from the past, but with interesting content you can start an automatic conversation about the brand or the product. Squarespace developed a website for those who want to create one of their own. There you can find veteran movie star and musician, Jeff Bridges, who help us catch some sleep with some special soft lullabies that can be downloaded after making a small donation the No Kid Hungry foundation. Coca-Cola has been working on the Happiness concept for a long time now. This year, they showed how a mistake can change network evilness by turning aggressive messages into compliments, a heated discussion into a laughter contest or simply cheering up a heartbroken girl. T-Mobile used a celebrity with a little twist and stuck to a trending topic of the last few months: stolen data and hacks. Kim Kardashian not only made fun of herself, but also reminded us to protect our online information, photos and data. In NoMore.org’s commercial, the organization against domestic violence showed us things are not always as they seem. In this emotional ad, ordering a pizza turns into a call for help. Nationwide had the most talked about commercial in social media on Sunday with some weird 45 seconds. Choosing emotionality as a resource is very common when it comes to a life insurance company, but it may backfire. The message and the tone were right, but it was very poorly executed, leaving everyone with their mouth open and having cold chills on their backs. This led to an enormous amount of jokes and memes that made us think: Is all advertising is good advertising? Maybe not.

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